Submitted by P2P on Fri, 03/25/2016 - 12:49

 

“Everything that irritates us about others can lead to an understanding of ourselves.” – Carl Jung

 

         

         Carl Jung is the founder of analytical psychology whose work altered psychology, philosophy, religion, literature and anthropology. Jung is generally considered the first modern psychologist to state the human psyche is by nature religious and to explore the idea. Carl Jung’s many major works include “Analytic Psychology: Its Theory and Practice,”
“Man and His Symbols”and his autobiography “Memories, Dreams, Reflections.”

Carl Jung was born in 1875 in Kesswil, Switzerland as the only son of a Protestant clergyman. As a boy Jung observed his parents and teachers behavior, especially the actions of his father. Jung’s father clung to his beliefs even as religion failed his family. Jung struggled to understand why and went against his father’s wish for continuing the family tradition by joining the clergy. Instead Jung choose to attend the University of Basel from 1895-1900.

After studying a variety of subjects at Basel, Jung became an assistant physician at Burgholzli Psychiatric clinic under Eugen Bleuler. In 1902 he obtained his M.D. from the University of Zurich. His dissertation was entitled “On the Psychology and Pathology of So-Called Occult Phenomena.” It was at this time Jung began to develop the concept of analytical psychology, specifically individuation. Individuation is the psychological process of combing opposites, including the conscious with the unconscious, while still maintaining their relative autonomy. Individuation helps describe the manner in which a thing is identified relative to other things. Jung considered individuation to be the central process of human development. This idea also advanced the believe in introvert and extrovert personalities as well as the power of the unconscious mind. Carl Jung died in 1961 with his work paving a legacy for the analysis of the human psyche and belief systems.

 

“Everything that irritates us about others can lead to an understanding of ourselves.” – Carl Jung